marijuana Archives - LCP Criminal Lawyers

Tag Archives: marijuana

Drug Charges and Drug Trafficking Charges

The Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) sets out which drugs are illegal in Canada
(marijuana, cocaine, heroin, etc.). There are four main offences in the CDSA: possession,
possession for the purpose, trafficking, and importing.

A possession charge means you are found with drugs in an amount for personal use. If it is your
first time facing a possession charge (under 30 grams of marijuana), you may be eligible for a diversion program. This means your charges may be withdrawn.

Possession for the purpose of trafficking means that you are in possession of an unlawful
substance for the purpose of selling or giving the substance to another person. This usually
means you are in possession of a large amount of an illegal substance – not for personal use (i.e.
you intend to sell the drugs). Trafficking in illegal drugs means selling or giving them to other
individuals, including undercover police officers. Importation of drugs occurs when you enter
Canada with an illegal substance.

Many people ask the question, “How do I beat my drug charge?” when charged with a drug
offence.

To be found guilty, the Crown must prove your guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. The Crown
must always prove the nature of the substance and possession of the substance. To prove
possession, the Crown must show that you had knowledge and control of the substance. When
charged with possession for the purpose of trafficking, the Crown must also prove that the
possession was for the purpose of trafficking.

Even if the Crown proves all of the necessary elements of the offence, you can still win your
case by demonstrating that your rights under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms have been
violated by the police. For example, your right to be protected against unlawful search and
seizure may have been violated if the police searched a home or a car without a search warrant.

If you have been arrested and charged with any drug offences (marijuana, cocaine, heroin, etc.),
Lockyer Campbell Posner can help you to avoid a criminal conviction.

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New Laws to Target High Drivers

It is common knowledge that driving drunk can lead to criminal charges. But what if you are driving high?

Currently, under section 253 of the Criminal Code, it is an offence to drive “impaired” and it is an offence to drive with a blood alcohol level of over 80 milligrams per 100 mL of blood (known in criminal law circles as “driving over 80”).

Drivers who have not been drinking but who are stoned or high generally don’t have to worry about the “over 80” offence, but they can be charged for driving “impaired”. Indicators of driving impaired may include:

  • Erratic driving
  • Dilated pupils/reddened eyes
  • Failing a “standard field sobriety test” (inability to walk-and-turn, standing on one leg)
  • Failing a “drug recognition evaluation” (examination of various factors including pupil size, blood pressure, injection sites, balance test)
  • Blood/urine drug tests

Because “impairment” can be subjective and difficult to prove (even blood and urine tests may be unable to establish “impairment” at the time of the offence), it has been rarer for people to be charged with drug-related impaired driving offences.

Bill C-46 sets out to change Canada’s approach to high drivers. The bill proposes amendments to the current impaired driving law that create “over 80” style rules for drivers on drugs. Accompanying regulations will define allowable “blood drug concentrations” and drivers who are caught driving with concentrations that exceed the new limits could be criminally charged. Until regulations are created and the new law comes into force, the current law stands.

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Arrested for growing and selling Marijuana?

Question:

Arrested for growing and selling Marijuana or Cannabis?

Answer:

Marijuana (marihuana, pot, cannabis) is set to become legal in Canada on October 17, 2018, but that doesn’t mean that it’s legal yet. Even when it is becomes legal, the purchase, sale, possession, and production of the drug will be heavily regulated. Here are some of the important laws that are anticipated to apply in Ontario:

  • In order to legally purchase, consume, or grow marijuana, you will need to be 19 years of age
  • You will only be able to consume it in a private residence
  • You will only be able to possess 30 grams of dried marihuana; and
  • You will only be able to grow four plants at any given residence

If you have been arrested and charged with any charges in relation to marijuana, or any other drugs under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, Lockyer Campbell Posner can help you to avoid a criminal conviction.

Related Topics

jail time, cannabis, how many years in jail, drug possession, health, grow up, license, legal, dispensary Toronto

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